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Guest Post: Simplicity 1318 Kimono Jacket

Hello everyone, my name is Kathy and this is my very first guest post for the Minerva Crafts Blog. You can find me over at www.sewdainty.co.uk where I enjoy writing pattern reviews, tutorials and product reviews.  I do hope you will enjoy reading my thoughts on this Simplicity Sewing Pattern - 1318 Kimono Jacket. I just love it! Let me tell you all about it.

I have to say that I do love a kimono jacket. Whilst I own a couple of ready to wear jackets like this I still wanted more so instead of buying another I decided that I would make one myself. Now that we can allow ourselves to turn our thoughts to Spring it seemed like the perfect time to do this. This jacket will easily see you through Spring, Summer and Autumn.

I really wanted a floral print, as I am a sucker for anything floral. I also needed a lovely light/medium weight drapey fabric. This Viscose Fabric I chose from Minerva is a really pretty viscose crepe fabric and is the perfect weight for this project. I really craved a background colour of blue as I knew I would wear this with jeans, denim shorts and white or navy linen trousers. Blue would be perfect to accompany all of these.

You will need very little supplies for this project. Aside from your fabric, you will need a small amount of Fusible Interfacing. Matching thread of course (use Minerva's matching thread service!), and basic sewing supplies that you probably already have including fabric scissors or rotary cutter and mat, pins and a needle for some hand sewing.

Before starting any project it is important to pre-wash your fabric. Viscose can be a little prone to a small amount of shrinkage and I did find this. I like to trace my pattern pieces - I find my weight goes up and down so this ensures that the pattern can be used again whatever size I am in the future! To get an accurate copy it's important to iron your pattern pieces, tracing paper and fabric before cutting. All time consuming but very important.

It's also crucial to study your fabric to see if it is directional. I didn't think my fabric particularly was but I did seem to prefer it one way up than the other so was careful to place my pattern pieces in the right direction.

I chose to make view D, and enjoyed that there weren't too many pieces to cut out. The style of the jacket means of course that the sleeves are attached to the body already so no tricky setting in sleeves. No zips. No buttons or buttonholes. No darts. No gathering. Easy right? Yes!

The back of the jacket comes in 2 halves and is sewn together with a central seam which runs from top to bottom. I chose to use a French seam for this, because as the jacket isn't lined I wanted it to be as pretty inside as possible. This was the right choice. This long vertical seam is nearly invisible using this technique.

I also decided that I would use the walking foot on my machine. For those not familiar with a walking foot it is very useful for working with slippery (or bulky) projects as it feeds the fabric through the machine from the top as well as the bottom. It's not essential - you will do very well using a regular foot too, but I found that using this made stitching smoother.

Next are the underarm seams. Whilst I would have loved to have used French seams here too, I knew that such a curved seam wouldn't lie flat using this technique, so I used a regular seam neatened with my overlocker. This worked out great. 

Pressing your seams as you go along is always important but it is especially so with this fabric. It ensures the seam stitches are pressed into place and was particularly useful in the underarm seams to avoid them looking 'pulled' or tight where the curve of the seam is (despite clipping the seam). I found my homemade Tailor's Seam Roll really great to help me with this and the difference before and after pressing was incredible.

Finally (apart from hemming your sleeves), it is time to make up the band which runs around the entire edge of this jacket. This is made from several pieces, and can be a little confusing, so take your time with it and follow the instructions carefully. I chose the slowest speed setting on my machine when sewing this on as it is nearly all curved edges so you need to take your time to make sure you get a neat finish. I should mention that there is a great deal of snipping and trimming the seam allowances for the band to lay flat. Take care when snipping not to catch the fabric below! Then repeat this for the band facing, and finally the instructions call for you to press the edge of the band facing under and HAND sew all the way around to attach to the jacket!

I have to say I wasn't expecting there to be so much hand sewing. Surely there must be a way of machine stitching this? Stitch in the ditch maybe? However I soon realised the reason for this is the curved edges of the band. In order to attach these to the jacket neatly without puckering there is nothing for it but to hand stitch. I actually quite enjoyed doing this. I sew very little by hand and found the whole process quite relaxing and I think my hand sewing skills have now improved.

This jacket is quick to make and I couldn't be more pleased with it. I know I will wear it lots and lots, and I will definitely be making another one (or two)! It's so flattering and can really dress an outfit up without being too fussy. The length is perfect for me (I'm 5'2"), but there are longer and shorter length options available if you prefer a different look.

I do hope this may have inspired you to have a go at making it yourself. I will warn you that the fabric choice at Minerva is huge, there are so many fabrics to choose from and very reasonable prices too. Grab a cuppa - it could take some time!

It's been such fun writing this guest post for Minerva, I do hope to write more, but in the meantime happy sewing!

Kathy

Comments (2)

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Kaye Glindo said:

Same with me, I love wearing floral designed kimonos. If you're into kimonos, you can get it here - https://www.limelush.com/ · 25th Jun 2018 11:25am

CHRISTINA GALLAGHER said:

Hi. I have had this pattern for a while now, and decided today to make a start. This has been a great help, I was wavering between views C and D but looking at your finished jacket, I think D is actually nicer than C. Hope mine turns out so well · 22nd Jan 2018 05:39pm