Even though there are so many vintage reproduction patterns on the market, not all of them are strictly retro-style. Some of the designs have more of a classic silhouette that can be achieved with modern patterns or even basic blocks. Spotting a unique one that truly represents an era is always an exciting event that leads to a fun sewing project and a true treasure in the wardrobe. That’s exactly how I felt when I was working on my Butterick B6485.
I must admit that most of the garments I sew are representing 40s and 50s style. It’s not only that I can’t help but pick designs that are glamorous, feminine and can be paired with cheerful floral prints. I do wear those dresses on daily basis and I’m planning on changing my style in the nearest future. I must agree that some vintage garments might be a bit too special for a regular day and that’s one of the things that make Butterick B6485 so versatile - it can be both casual or fancy! 
While keeping an eye on this pattern for quite a while I was surprised that it’s not really a popular one. There are just a few reviews in the community (all good though) and, let’s be honest, it’s quite undeserved. First of all, this pattern is quite easy to work with. It has front pleats that can help you adjust the fit quick and easy. I actually used this trick and added an extra cm to all of them to turn the dress into a more close-fitting piece. But this dress doesn’t have to be adjusted to the bodycon stage thanks to the front ties and a loose back. So 40s! Not to mention the front tuck details that make it even more retro. 
The only difficulty you can face while sewing the dress comes from the fabric, not the pattern itself. It's designed for lightweight materials that can be tricky to work with. But once you master your silk or viscose cutting skills - it all becomes a breeze! And don’t be surprised with the recommended fabric amount. That must be one of the few times when 2,3 meters do mean 2,3 meters and nothing less than that. I had just 2 and I had to shorten the hem a bit, cut from a single layer of fabric and as carefully as possible. Luckily it all worked out and I didn’t have to shorten the ties aswell. Speaking about the hem - don’t forget to let it drop for a day or two before you sew it. The dress has a bit of a curvy hem so it’s a must!
My fabric choice was very appropriate for this pattern. It’s a bright yellow viscose with beautiful daisies all over it. I was a bit worried that it’ll give me some hard time matching the plaid (especially considering the fact that I didn’t have enough fabric), but it was very easy and smooth. The print doesn’t have “strict” geometrically speaking plaids, so it’s really easy to match them even though this dress has 5 seams to match and 6 darts and pleats. Unfortunately Minerva have sold out of this print now but these have lots of other Viscose Challis Fabrics to choose from.
I’m really happy with how my dress turned out and I can definitely recommend this pattern paired with some gorgeous viscose prints from Minerva Crafts!I must admit that most of garments are sew are representing 40s and 50s style. It’s not only that I can’t help but pick designs that are glamorous, feminine and full can be paired with cheerful floral prints. I do wear those dresses on daily basis and I’m planning on changing my style in the nearest future. I must agree that some vintage garments might be a bit too special for a regular day and that’s one of the things that make Butterick B6485 so versatile - it can be both casual or fancy! 
While keeping an eye at this pattern for quite a while I was surprised that it’s not really a popular one. There are just a few reviews in the community (all good though) and, let’s be honest, it’s quite undeserved. First of all, this pattern is quite easy to work with. It has front pleats that can help you to adjust the fit quick and easy. I actually used this trick and added an extra cm to all of them to turn the dress into a more close fitting piece. But this dress doesn’t have to be adjust to the bodycon stage thanks to the front ties and a loose back. So 40s! Not to mention the front tuck details that make it even more retro. 
The only difficulty you can face while sewing the dress comes from the fabric, not the pattern itself. It designed for lightweight materials that can be tricky to work with. But once you master you silk or viscose cutting skills - it all becomes a breeze! And don’t be surprised with the recommended fabric amount. That must be one of the few times when 2,3 metres do mean 2,3 metres and nothing less than that. I had just 2 and I had to shorten the hem a bit, cut from a single layer of fabric and as carefully as it’s possible. Luckily it all worked and I didn’t have to shorted the ties too. Speaking about hem - don’t forget to let it drop for a day or two before you sew it. The dress has a bit of a curvy hem so it’s a must!
My fabric choice was a very appropriate for this pattern. It’s a bright yellow viscose with beautiful daisies all over it. I was a bit worried that it’ll give me some hard time matching the plaid (especially considering the fact that I didn’t have enough fabric), but it was very easy and smooth. The print doesn’t have “strict” geometrically speaking plaids, so it’s really easy to match them even though this dress has 5 seams to match and 6 darts and pleats. 
I’m really happy with how my dress turned out and I can definitely to recomend this pattern paired with some gorgeous viscose prints from Minerva Crafts!